Tag Archives: Halifax Public Libraries

Blogging with Halifax, NS Public Libraries: A Match Made in Two-Point-Whoa Heaven

6 Dec

Perhaps, after my last post, I am growing attached to these newfound rose-coloured glasses, and I’m growing soft. Or maybe I’ve settled too comfortably into this new world of blogging and I’ve grown rather partial to it.

It’s likely a bit of both, but I think the major factor here is the nature of blogging itself. Since starting this assignment I have had a lurking suspicion that blogs, by virtue of their structure and style, were the most compatible, with libraries, of all the Web 2.0 tools I’ve discussed so far.

This is my first foray into blogging, and I can’t claim to be very well-acquainted with the intricacies of blog creation, but I do read enough of them to have a general knowledge of how they work and what functions they serve.

Exploring Halifax Public Libraries’ blog, called “The Reader,” my suspicions were confirmed. The adoption of this tool by the library feels natural and useful and very well done. I was very pleased to find as much, not least because I was hoping to be able to end this run on an upbeat note!

To start at the beginning: the blog is very easy to find on the library’s website, both on its homepage and from the applicable “Readers” page. The usability of blogs in general and of this blog in particular is a big part, I think, of why they work so well for libraries. The simple RSS-feed format, the blog archives, and the tags and tag clouds all make it easy to find the latest news, to search old posts, and to browse related topics.

HPL's blog

http://www.thereader.ca/

The format also allows for maximally effective communication. Unlike micro-blogging sites like Twitter, where character limits and space restrictions often seem to force users to resort to Internet slang, cryptic abbreviations, and inadequate abstracts, blogs allow the library to convey its news using whatever language and structure are deemed most appropriate. This makes the information accessible to a wider audience of library users, and allows for more information to be conveyed at a time, thereby enabling access to information and keeping with library goals.

The subject matter of this blog is also marvellously relevant to the library and to its users. It provides a reader’s advisory service, with recommendations of specific books. Each recommendation comes with a playful but professional, informative but accessible description, and the posts are written by several different contributors so there is a highly desirable diversity of tastes and opinions among them. Since the blog is updated every day with few exceptions, the suggestions are topical and seasonally-appropriate, too.

This currency also promotes an image of the library itself as being active and contemporary, and the frequency of the updates is a big draw for potential readers, thereby embedding this library service into the everyday lives of users.

The fact that the blog is minimally social, I think, is a positive thing in this instance, although this doesn’t conform to most people’s conceptions of Web (or even Library) 2.0. Users are able to comment on blog posts, but these comments are hidden until a reader clicks on the “Comments” link, which is placed very subtly at the bottom of the post. User comments are not as widely-used in the blogging community as they are on sites like Facebook, and I think this is due to the atmosphere of the service. Since it is less focussed on the social aspect, libraries are better able to control their image and keep content professional and appropriate.

My resulting conclusion is a simple one: The blog is a powerful tool for libraries, and a good fit for them. As with any Web 2.0 tool, a library must ensure, before embarking on its own blogging adventure, that it is able and willing to maintain the blog, providing high-quality and up-to-date content on a regular basis. HPL demonstrates how well this can be done by using blogging to provide reader’s advisory services. “The Reader” exemplifies many of the principles I’ve discussed throughout this blog; it is widely accessible and highly usable, it communicates effectively with patrons and informs them about library-related news. It is inherently relevant to the library and its services, indeed providing a service in and of itself. It promotes the library as a valuable resource and important community member. Most importantly, it provides an approachable, personal, and somewhat social aspect to library service, attracting a wide variety of users through topical, high-quality content, while still allowing the library to maintain a respectable and professional image and identity.

I think blogging perfectly embodies many of the goals and ideals of Library-Two-Point-Whoa, and what better place to sign off on such a project than this? I have no doubt that libraries will continue to experiment and work with Web 2.0 tools of all kinds, and that they will continue to improve the quality of their engagement with them. It’s certain that there’s still a lot to be learned- mistakes to be made, content to be updated, features to be adapted- but I’m confident that libraries- and above all, librarians- are up to the challenge. For now, it seems an auspicious and hopeful omen that blogs – one of the earliest Web 2.0 tools to gain popularity- and for our purposes, HPL’s blog in particular, can so perfectly actualise the vision of libraries utilising these technologies to further their goals: creatively and effectively promoting their institutions, connecting with their users, and serving their communities.

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